20thlogo

Las Vegas, NV
March 19 - 22, 2023

"Upping the Ante on Student Success"

Now Accepting Presentation Proposals!

Deadline Extended!
Now through December 22nd

Things to Know:

  • Presentations Are Held Monday thru Wednesday

    Presentation slots will be assigned based on content.

    The types of sessions we are looking for are: paper/presentation, research, workshop, panel or roundtable, and demonstration.

  • Presentations Last for 50 Minutes

    All presentations will have a total run time of 50 minutes. This includes any Q&A and breaks as deemed appropriate by the presenter.

Interested?

Proposal Guidelines
Submit Now!

Registration Information

Member Registration

Early Bird Registrations February 10

Standard
Registration

$450
$ 400
  • Pre-conference Workshops Require Additional Registration Fees
Early Bird
Member

Student & Retiree
Registration

$300
$ 250
  • Pre-conference Workshops Require Additional Registration Fees
Early Bird
Member

Non-Member Registration

Early Bird Registrations February 10

Standard
Registration

$600
$ 550
  • Pre-conference Workshops Require Additional Registration Fees
  • Includes Conference Registration and 1-year ACTP Membership
Early Bird
Non-Member

Student & Retiree
Registration

$450
$ 400
  • Pre-conference Workshops Require Additional Registration Fees
  • Includes Conference Registration and 1-year ACTP Membership
Early Bird
Non-Member

Keynote

Seven Trends Affecting the Future of Learning Assistance

Hunter R Boylan, Ph.D

Professor and Executive Director Emeritus National Center for Developmental Education

In a career spanning over three decades, Dr. Boylan has served as a community college and university instructor, an academic adviser, learning center director, TRIO Program Director, Director of the Doctoral Program in Developmental Education at Grambling State University, Director of the Kellogg Institute, President of the National Association for Developmental Education, Chair of the Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations. and Director of the National Center for Developmental Education. He is the author of 7 books and over 100 articles, monographs, and book chapters. He is widely sought after as a speaker on the topics of learning assistance and developmental education and is frequently quoted in the media for his views on these topics.

Venue Information

3300 Las Vegas BLVD S
Las Vegas, NV 89109

Room Rate

$89/nt + tax 

Vendor Information

Bronze
Silver
Gold
Verbal Recognition at Welcome Reception
Vendor Information Table
Flyer Included in Conference Folder (Vendor Provided)
Digital Recognition
Guaranteed Presentation Session
Conference Registrations
0
1
2

$350

$650

$1,100

Gold Level

$ 450
  • 1 Conference Registration
  • 1 Exhibition Table
  • 1 Presentation Slot
Limited Spaces

Silver Level

$ 350
  • 1 Conference Registration
  • Exhibition Table

Preconference Workshop Proposals Are Being Accepted Now!

Through June 24th

Things to Know:

  • All Workshops are held on Sunday

    Either as a morning or afternoon session. Workshop time slots will be assigned in early Fall 2022.

  • Workshops Last for 165 Minutes

    All workshops will have a total run time of 2 hours and 45 minutes. This includes any Q&A and breaks as deemed appropriate by the presenter.

  • Usefulness is Key

    Workshops should provide attendees with information, skills, materials, and/or ideas that can be implemented efficiently upon returning from the conference.

Interested?

Submit Now!

Conference at a Glance

Sunday

  • 8:00am - 4:00pm

Registration

  • 9:00am - 11:30am

Morning PreConference Workshops

  • 11:30am - 1:30pm

Lunch

  • 1:30pm - 4:00pm

Afternoon PreConference Workshops

  • 4:10pm - 4:40pm

Tutor Training - Toward Certification

ACTP Certification Information Session

Monday

  • 8:00am - 4:00pm

Registration

  • 8:00am - 4:00pm

Exhibitor Hall

  • 8:00am - 8:50am

Welcome Plenary Session

  • 9:00am - 9:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group A

  • 10:00am - 10:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group B

  • 11:00am - 11:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group C

  • 12:00pm - 1:50pm

Keynote Luncheon

  • 2:00pm - 2:50pm

Concurrent Sessions

Group D

  • 3:00pm - 3:50pm

Concurrent Sessions

Group E

Tuesday

  • 8:00am - 4:00pm

Exhibitor Hall

  • 8:00am - 8:50am

Breakfast on your own

  • 9:00am - 9:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group F

  • 10:00am - 10:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group G

  • 11:00am - 11:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group H

  • 12:00pm - 1:50pm

Lunch on Your Own

  • 2:00pm - 2:50pm

Concurrent Sessions

Group I

  • 2:00pm - 2:50pm

Concurrent Sessions

Group J

  • 3:00pm - 3:50pm

Concurrent Sessions

Group K

Wednesday

  • 8:00am - 12:00pm

Exhibitor Hall

  • 8:00am - 8:50am

Breakfast on your own

  • 9:00am - 9:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group L

  • 10:00am - 10:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group M

  • 11:00am - 11:50am

Concurrent Sessions

Group N

Presentation Schedule

All times and titles subject to change
8:00 am
8:00 am

Registration Table Open

9:00 am
9:00 am

Preconference Group I

Stay, Hit, or Split: Tools, Resources, and Information for New Tutoring Center Directors
Robert Jordan

Are you a new tutoring center director? Learn how to gain traction in your new environment and develop the basis for an action plan for the next year as well as a multi-year strategic plan. In this session, you will be presented with a multitude of ideas, resources, and tools to develop or enhance key facets of your tutoring center to increase its impact. Topics may include: conducting an informal review, developing vision/mission, planning, program design and implementation, training, budgeting, status reporting, creating a tutor handbook, managing and improving daily operations, developing an annual report, implementing an advisory board, dealing with bureaucracy, and more!

Not Just for Tutoring: Funding & Growing an Academic Coaching Program at an Existing Learning Assistance Center
John Findura & Kelli Hayes

This workshop focuses on creating an Academic Coaching program either from the ground-up or as an extension of an existing learning assistance center using Bergen Community College’s Cerullo Learning Assistance Center and its integration of an Academic Coaching Program into its already robust tutoring services as a model. From funding (including finding grant opportunities) to recruiting Academic Coaches, from getting faculty buy-in to integrating academic coaching into the college’s culture, we will look at laying the groundwork for this expansion of services for an already award-winning learning center. An open discussion about funding, best practices, and separating the “Tutor” from the “Academic Coach” along with participant feedback will be highly encouraged.

Marketing and Outreach: Using online tools to increase student engagement
Veronica Sheehan

How do we increase awareness of our programs with the students we serve? Word of mouth and faculty outreach both have their limits. Getting information in front of as many individuals as possible requires both strategy and creativity. We have to not only identify where they are and how to get there ourselves but we also must produce materials that are of interest and relevance. This workshop aims to give a framework that can be used to develop marketing strategies and to provide tools that will help everyone creating engaging materials. A laptop is required for this session.

12:00 pm
12:00 pm

Lunch on Your Own

2:00 pm
2:00 pm

Preconference Group II

Tutor Training 101
Pinder Naidu

The ACTP tutor training workshop is intended to promote excellence in tutor training through the presentation of topics that will provide credit towards the tutor training certification. This workshop will cover tutoring basics – role playing, tutor contracts, self-regulated learning, study-skills, learning and cognition, and some basics of tutor training for coordinators. Please be ready to share ideas in this interactive workshop.
 

Counting Cards: Using Excel to analyze and relay data
Robert Jordan

Behind every successful learning center is a steady, constant stream of data that is vital to the long-term operations of the program. Learning centers often rely on their data to demonstrate effectiveness, justify budget requests, and most importantly pinpoint areas that may need review or improvement. This makes proper data analysis a vital part of the survival and growth of learning centers. While every center does its own, slightly different, data analysis; most aspects of the data analysis process remain the same. This presentation will take you through this process from beginning to end. It will discuss important data that learning centers should be collecting and ways to visualize and analyze that data using summary statistics and statistical testing. Differences between positive and negative outlook data will be discussed as well as how to present each to relay results that are both easily digestible and meaningful. This presentation will demonstrate using Microsoft Excel*  to produce reports and discuss the benefits of doing analyses outside of a data tracking system. Finally, a group discussion of important tests will wrap up the presentation. A Laptop is required for this session.

8:00 am
8:00 am

Registration Table Open

8:00 am
8:00 am

Welcome Breakfast

9:00 am
9:00 am

Session Group I

Exploring the Perception of Black Males on Academic Probation Participating in Academic Coaching
Terrance McClain

Black males in college are reported as having the lowest completion rate of any gender and racial group (U.S. Department of Education, National Center of Education Statistics, 2019; Wood & Palmer, 2014). Across institution types (i.e., public, private, for-profit) Black males have a 34% 6-year graduate rate compared to White (61%), Hispanics (50%), Asian (70%), Pacific Islander (50%), and American Indian, Alaska Native (35%) (U.S. Department of Education, National Center of Education Statistics, 2019).  In this presentation you will discover strategies for coaching Black males more effectively based on a recent research study.

 

Spotlight: Improving Student Outcomes in High Impact Courses with Focused Tutoring
Rebekah Faber-Starr

Spotlight Tutoring (SLT) is a topic driven, active and collaborative means of supplemental instruction that proactively connects a tutor to a student providing another way for a student to receive support. Traditional tutoring connects the student to a tutor and puts the focus on individual problems; tutors can be disconnected from the course and the instructor. In a SLT model, specific content, problems, or questions are identified and addressed, proactively. This type of focused learning assistance allows for a better gage of student morale and attitude (persistence in the course). It is specific, module-type instruction that focuses on the course material, includes active learning, and introduces students to proven, effective study strategies.  Sessions are developed in collaboration between tutors, faculty and students.\r\nAnatomy & Physiology I is a key course for students pursuing an associate degree in registered nursing and students must achieve a C (70%) in A&PI. From fall 2018 to Spring 2021, an average of 53% (220 out of 429) earned a C or higher in BIO 231. During the Spring 2022 term, instructors at Northwest State Community College (NSCC) developed the SLT program to improve tutoring in high impact Natural Science courses, including BIO 231 and 232. In Fall 2018-Spring 2021 high impact Biology courses, compelling evidence showed that tutoring interactions strongly signaled better grades. Spring and preliminary Fall 2022 data indicate SLT has been highly effective.

 

Increasing the Odds of Student Success: A Model Program
Kathy Friedenreich

 In this interactive presentation, we will explore a model program encompassing a tight coupling between academic advising, academic coaching and peer tutoring for Engineering students.  We will explore a definition of academic success for STEM students and the best practices which lead to increased academic outcomes and independent learning. The Engineering Academic Support Program (EASP), embedded in the College of Engineering at Auburn University, strives to scaffold academic skills and strategies through modeling, feedback, questioning, and collaboration.

 

Empowering Students through Peer-Led Self-Reflection
Abbey Berkebile

During academic mentoring and coaching, self-reflection empowers students to take ownership over the academic skills and behaviors they need to be successful in college. Students also have the capability to know what has and hasn’t worked for them in the past and what barriers might get in the way of their success. However, not all students know how to reflect on their experiences and apply that reflection to future situations. Training peer mentors and peer coaches to facilitate self-reflection with their peers, can help students unlock that knowledge. Having the student self-reflect also helps mentors and coaches gain a thorough understanding of their students’ specific concerns so they can better guide them.

10:00 am
10:00 am

Session Group II

Up the Ante with an Academic Coaching State of Mind
Elizabeth Hommowun

 Illinois College is a small, private 4-year liberal arts institution with fewer than 1200 students. Our academic coaching program is situated to provide holistic support for each student, as part of a larger initiative to intervene on issues of belonging, inclusion, equity, and justice.  Our center is named “The Center for Academic Excellence” as a daily reminder that every student has their own story and needs support in their own way; nothing is universal. To that end, each academic coach has been trained under a philosophy of supporting the entire personal experience, referring and advocating for other campus resources as the entire scope of student support. While each coach delivers our program philosophy with their own unique touches, our work is grounded in intentionality and transparency. Within our session, we will demonstrate how we move our students towards academic excellence within two specific retention groups: first-year students and students on academic probation. We will do this by demonstrating the myriad ways we collect information on student groups we work with both before and during an academic semester as a way to up the ante on student success by purposeful design.

The Making of a Peer Leader Education Course: Hybrid Edition
Sari Katzen

The Learning Centers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick offers a 3-credit pedagogy course required for first-time peer leaders in our Learning Assistant Program, which supports their peer leader training. After the switch to online instruction during the pandemic and two years’ worth of lessons learned, we have implemented best practices of remote teaching and learning to create what turned out to be a successful, sustainable model for the course. This session focuses on the course’s hybrid structure and curriculum through weekly asynchronous and in-person class activities and how the instructional team reflected on the design and decision-making processes of the course. Instructor and student feedback on the course’s multiple transitions will be shared to demonstrate what were found to be effective measures and future considerations to make about the class.

Calling an Audible: How we changed our offensive strategy to create academic coaching buy in for students with unique learning abilities and athletes
Amanda Thomson

Too often, bright, and intellectually capable students are academically unsuccessful because they are hindered by transitional difficulties, executive functioning challenges, or learning disabilities. Academic support professionals agree that academic coaching can provide support beyond content tutoring to allow these students to prosper. We had tried many ways to incorporate coaching on campus, but we could not get past one hurdle-student buy in. Time to call an audible and change our offensive strategy. Using a relational approach, we have begun to create a coaching culture on our campus for our athletes and students with documented learning challenges leading to improved student success and retention.

Leveling Up: Promoting Professionalism Among Young Professional, Student-Workers
Dan Gianoutsos

Many student success centers across the nation operate with a high percentage of student-workers. Positions like tutors, SI leaders, front desk workers (etc.) provide students professional opportunities. Studies suggest that students who work on campus are more likely to possess better retention and graduation rates, achieve higher academic achievements, and engage more on campus (Beason & Wessel, 2002; Elling & Elling, 2000; Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005; Wade et al., 2020). With a large scale of student-workers comes the responsibility of overseeing them and helping them reach their full professional potential. Compared to full-time employees, student-workers are more likely to be young professionals, place an emphasis on their social life, and focus on academics. Considering these dynamics, student-worker supervisors find themselves frequently addressing topics related to professionalism. This presentation demonstrates how the UNLV Academic Success Center practitioners uphold professional standards for their 80-plus student-workers, focusing particularly on tutors, SI leaders, and front desk workers. Professional standards include communication (verbal,written), open mindset, ethics, conflict management, dress code, safety, consistency, punctuality, body language demeanor, responsibility, academics and work balance, and other work etiquette elements. The goal is to help supervisors better instill and improve professional expectations among their student-workers.

11:00 am
11:00 am

Session Group III

Part of your world – Drawing inspiration from Disney’s five Keys
Madeline Rodnite

The role of the coach requires quite a unique skill set, with one of those skills being customer service.  One company may come to mind when thinking about customer service done right – The Walt Disney Company.  Through the use of the five keys, safety, courtesy, show, efficiency and inclusion, the Walt Disney company created, maintains a client – focused culture. This presentation will translate these keys into practice for meeting with our students in the coaching environment.

Connecting With Students
Peter Legner

Of all the factors that contribute to student success, there may be no issue that correlates as highly as how students connect with faculty and staff outside the classroom.  Students who build connections with faculty, tutors, staff at the college they attend are likely to get better grades, remain in college, and enjoy the college experience.  This seminar will summarize the literature that shows how important these connections are and offer practical advice on how to build connections with students.  Attendees will also be invited to share their ideas on how they have built connections with students in their settings.

Fulfilling the Promise: Working with Academically Dismissed and Reinstated Students
Beverlyn Grace-Odeleye

The presentation will describe a new Academic Dismissal approach implemented for students on probation who fail to receive a semester GPA of 2.200, and who were academically dismissed for the Fall semester of 2021. The presentation will discuss academic and nonacademic factors contributing to academic dismissal and identify factors that influenced reinstatement

Reputation Matters – Why You Need a Personal Brand
Treva Graves

Chances are, you spend at least some time thinking about your reputation at work. Your professional footprint isn’t made of sand. It should be solid and your impact matters. You were meant to do what you’re going to do when you’re doing it.

12:00 pm
12:00 pm

Keynote Lunch

Seven Trends Affecting the Future of Learning Assistance
Dr. Hunter R Boylen

2:00 pm
2:00 pm

Session Group IV

The Leader in You
Stephanie Dunaief

Do you want to be a stronger leader in your business, but don’t know where to begin? Leading isn’t always about giving direct instruction. There are many different leadership styles and strategies. While some people may have a preferred style, different styles can be useful in different situations. This will include an overview and strategies to help administrators and managers become stronger leaders.

Do You See What ISEE? Creating an Intercampus Staff Exchange Experience for Learning Center Supervisors
Roberto Godinez

Many colleges offer learning support services across several campuses to maximize student outreach, but facilities, student populations, and staffing can vary significantly from campus to campus. Supervisors tend to put on blinders and focus on their center’s specific needs, but this may lead to decreased collaboration and consistency across affiliated centers. South Texas College serves over 28,000 students at five campus Centers for Learning Excellence (CLEs), each with its own Coordinator, team of tutors, and campus needs. Learn how our team of Coordinators leveraged an Intercampus Staff Exchange Experience to create a stronger institutional support system for students and tutors.

The New Normal: Asynchronous & Synchronous Online and In-Person Academic Coaching
Lucille Leung

Learn how an academic coaching program at the Rutgers University Learning Centers adapted to life after COVID-19 by developing and offering services in various modes, including creating asynchronous online modules that has served over 13,000 students in the first two years of launch. Participants in this session will also share what modes of academic support they currently have at their school and how they have adjusted to the current needs of the students through the pandemic and return to campus. Brainstorm interactively to identify potential solutions to help overcome challenges faced since the return to campus and even begin to develop your own plan for an asynchronous online module.

Hitting The Jackpot: Sending Coaches To The Classroom Pays Off
Kristen Karpinski

With the largest first-year class in our school’s history, enrollment being at an all-time high, and wide-spread reports by our students of elevated levels of anxiety since returning from COVID, logic would suggest that our Peer Academic Coaches would be busy meeting with students. This was not the case, however, as we experienced low participation that was frustrating for both our Program administrators and our coaches.

3:00 pm
3:00 pm

Session Group V

Let’s talk about Academic Recover Programs for student success
Natasha Ziegler

Especially after the COVID-19 pandemic, students seem to be having an even harder time succeeding academically. Some institutions seek to develop academic recovery programs and establish mandatory workshops. Within this presentation, the presenter will share their 10 years of experience running multiple academic recovery programs for students with grade point averages below 2.00. Participants should come ready to discuss their current programming structure, successes, and areas of improvement with their colleagues.

Fostering Learning and Academic Tenacity in an Era Focused on Assumptions
Ray Sanchez

This presentation will emphasize the importance of continuing to train our tutors using long-standing, evidence-based effective practices—in other words, focusing directly on improving and increasing student learning—rather than becoming distracted by other institutional goals and functions which are often built upon assumptions and driven by wider cultural influences. An important distinction will be made between the (valuable and important) equity of 10 years ago with the current version in the form of antiracism and equity-mindedness which is loaded with unvetted, often contradictory presuppositions. Learning outcomes and “21st century skills” improve, across the college and in our Tutoring and Learning Centers, when we (and students!) invest in deep academic engagement.

The evolution and early successes of the Wayne CC Coaching, Advising, and Planning for Success project
Patrick Saxon

This session will cover the progression of the WCC Achievement Coach program during a high growth phase that resulted from an institutional self-study. In this study, advising was identified as a challenge to student success. Subsequently a Title III grant was written and awarded with the goal of growing the Achievement Coach program.

Recruiting, Training, and Supervising Tutors: Illinois statewide Tutoring Initiative Program
Jeongae Kang
The student achievement gap between high- and low-achieving students has been a critical issue in the U.S for a long time. However, COVID-19 has increased the gap (Bailey et al., 2021). The Illinois tutoring initiative program launched in the fall of 2021 intends to close such a gap by providing substantial and consistent support to 3rd to 8th-grade students in literacy and math, especially for the unprivileged groups across the state. For the last two years, the IL tutoring initiative program has worked with multiple institutional partners and 65 high-need school districts to identify students for this initiative and the academic areas where participating students may need supplemental tutoring services. Within the framework of high-impact tutoring principles (e.g., Dietrichson et al., 2017; Nickow et al., 2020; Robinson & Loeb, 2021), IL tutoring initiative primarily focused on recruiting, training, and supervising high-quality tutors because tutors are critical implementors of high impact tutoring (Robinson et al., 2021). This presentation aims to give an overview of the IL tutoring initiative, focusing on how IL statewide tutoring initiative program recruits, prepares and supervises tutors for quality tutoring sessions. In addition, this presentation will share challenges for the last two years’ implementation and plan for our implications for continuously preparing tutors.

8:00 am
8:00 am

Registration Table Open

8:00 am
8:00 am

Breakfast on your own

9:00 am
9:00 am

Session Group VI

Make Peace with Your Body So You Can Be Present in Your Life
Nicole Ayers

You miss the memory-making moments when you’re more worried about how you look than who you’re with or what you’re doing. But it’s not just the memory-making moments that are lost when you’re striving for somebody else’s version of a “good” body. You miss out on your life.\r\nIn this session, Nicole will guide participants through the three-part framework—Awaken. Heal. Live.—so they can live their lives with presence and intention. She’ll provide strategies that can be implemented immediately, along with personal insights and gracious encouragement, so that participants will feel empowered to step onto the body-acceptance path and transform their lives.

 

Hit the Jackpot Using Data
Jennifer Bebergal
he collection, analysis, and reporting out of your tutoring and coaching data may be the most important aspect of your role in these programs. Without data analysis, we are unsure of how we are doing, how we can improve, and how we can best share our stories to get the funding we need to expand our programs and support more students. In this session, the leaders of two large learning centers will share the various tools and sources they use to collect, analyze, and share data with different stakeholders and how they use these data to improve their programs and gain additional resources. Find new ways to HIT the resource JACKPOT as you SHOW YOUR HAND – and it’s full of ACES!

How you can use EQ to redefine your client sessions
Nicola Burbank

As a coach the most important thing we have to build is trust within our relationship with our clients. Understanding how to use emotional intelligence to build a stronger relationship with your clients should be your first goal. This presentation dives into understanding how to take your own emotion and experiences out of the equation so you can best help your clients.

 

It’s a Balancing Act! Incorporating Sanford’s Challenge & Support into Academic Coaching
Sheila Coressel

Supporting a student, while also challenging their thoughts, actions, etc., goes hand-in-hand with academic coaching.  This presentation will introduce and explain Sanford’s psychosocial theory and provide examples on how to incorporate it in coaching sessions.

10:00 am
10:00 am

Session Group VII

Motivating Your Staff
Stephanie Dunaieff

Everyone responds to motivation differently and are motivated by different techniques. Creating a good motivation plan that will reach multiple employees is important to keep everyone motivated and engaged at work. While many employers use monetary rewards to motivate employees, that does not work for everyone. This workshop will be live and interactive.

\Why Not Both?\”: Cross-Training Academic Coaches and Tutors
John Findura

Bergen Community College’s Cerullo Learning Assistance Center has been assisting students through tutoring for over 35 years. With the development of our brand-new Academic Coaching Program in January 2022, we have been able to serve even more students than before. But Tutoring and Coaching are two different things, right? Tutors are not coaches and coaches are not tutors. For a variety of reasons, we needed a group who could accomplish both, and that was the beginning of our cross-training of Academic Coaches and Tutors. This presentation focuses on how our Tutor Training Programs and Academic Coach Training Programs were formed and how we are able to cross-train over 120 peer and professional tutors and coaches. We also discuss the different goals of each program, the differences in the roles, the differences in student expectations, and most importantly, how to keep each functioning without overstepping each program’s boundaries.

Build marketing techniques: Using Starfish to improve learning center numbers
Saul Garza

Purpose In the Pain
Zuriel Gibson

My over all goal for all my clients is to make sure you are in position for you to Help me to Help you to be able to Help others as you accomplish the goals you have set in life and leave your mark on this world. by achieving Personal and Professional goals beyond that diagnosis.

11:00 am
11:00 am

Session Group VIII

Moving Forward by Looking Back: Using Reflection to Develop Peer Tutors
Quentin James

Expeditiously building the confidence and competence of our peer tutors was one of the primary objectives when we reconstructed our peer tutor education program. With this in mind, we focused on reinforcing pedagogy and andragogy through reflection. Critical reflection is considered by many as a fundamental component of effective teaching and learning. In our recent revamp, we have focused on engaging with reflection as a human tendency and emphasizing the ways in which regular reflection practice can strengthen interpersonal communication and community building in general, and positively affect student-to-student communication, critical thinking and growth, specifically. We have furthermore been able to use this reflection to enhance metacognition, one of our core values, at all levels of teaching\/learning. Encouraging discussion between peer tutors as well as with students, and their subsequent reflections, can demonstrate a big-picture application for the process of learning as they are necessary components of establishing oneself as a learner within a community of practice.

Las Vegas Is Calling…All Academic Coaches
Jessica Johnson

Do you know what it takes to be a successful Academic Coach? Do you need a better understanding of how to coach your students in their academics and to ensure they are successful? In this session, participants will learn how to be a successful Academic Coach by understanding the role of the Academic Coach, the need to establish a specific model and know how to ask intentional questions. This session focuses on the Academic Coaching & Engagement (ACE) PeerKnights Coaching program at the University of Central Florida (UCF), but the model and strategies provided can be adapted by any individual to become an impactful academic coach. Participants will also be provided with examples of activities they can implement when training their coaches.

Know when to fold ‘em: Change management for a successful coaching program
P. Brandon Johnson

Organizational change can be a complex process that often involves emotions, logistics, and many questions. For almost a decade, the Student Success Advocates– a coaching adjacent program – was a fixture of the Office of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Utah. However, the hiring of a new dean and department leadership brings new perspectives and priorities. One of many priorities included dissolving the Advocate program in favor of a new Student Success Coaching program based on the Inside Track model of coaching.

12:00 pm
12:00 pm

Lunch on Your Own

2:00 pm
2:00 pm

Session Group IX

What do you Want to Learn Today? How to Use Formative Assessment to Create a Program Tailored to Your Peer Educators’ Needs
Megan Keebler

While formative assessment is a tried and true method for creating classroom curriculum tailored to students’ specific needs, peer educator training programs too often fall back on methodologies that, while rooted in best practice, can fail to meet the ever-changing needs of current tutors and SI Leaders. Come find out how the Chaffey SI Program transformed our training protocol through the use of formative assessment. After a pre-semester training using predetermined topics, our ongoing semester training focuses on the unique needs of each semester’s group of leaders. Through training evaluations, polls about leaders’ desired training topics, feedback from mentor leaders about specific strengths and weaknesses of each group, SI leader spotlights, and more, the Chaffey SI training program is flexible, ever changing, and designed to support our leaders’ specific strengths and areas for growth. Come find out how you can do the same!

Students First!
Kristen Long

AVID in the Tutor Training Class
Denise Kruizengea-Muro

If you have heard of the AVID program, you probably know of it from your children’s middle school or high school. Perhaps they had a friend in AVID classes. Or, maybe you have never heard of AVID. AVID, or Advancement Via Individual Determination, is a program designed to help low performing students in K-12 succeed in challenging college-preparatory courses through individual determination, strong support, and structured activities. Developed in the 1980s, AVID has been helping middle and high school students get organized, take focused notes, and tackle challenging material for decades.\r\nOnly recently have colleges discovered that many of their students were AVID students before graduating and coming to college. AVID students were easy to spot because they were better prepared than their peers who were not in AVID. To make AVID available for those who had not been exposed to it in K-12, AVID responded with AHE, or AVID for Higher Education, described as “an integrated, research-based, college success system” that prepares college faculty to use the learning and study strategies with which their students are already familiar to help students, particularly underrepresented students, succeed in college (Shapiro & Cuseo, 2018, p. v)

Learning Center Leadership Certification (LCLC)
Jenny Haley

Are you consumed with programming, data collection and analysis, training, marketing, and the daily pressures of working as a learning center administrator?  Lost in the shuffle is YOU, the individual, who deserves to be recognized and certified for the leader you are.  The LCLC is attached to you, not the center, training program, or student staff.

3:00 pm
3:00 pm

Session Group X

CRLA Peer Educator & Tutor Training Program Certification
Dorothy Kemp

CRLA has been certifying tutor and peer educator training programs for over thirty years. With more than 1,500 currently certified programs and hundreds of new applications every year, CRLA is widely recognized as the leader in college and university training program certification throughout the United States and around the world. \r\nWith over 65 research-based topics to choose from and extensive resources to guide you from program design through delivery and assessment, our dedicated team of volunteers are here to help you every step of the way. Come learn more about why CRLA’s International Tutor Training Program Certification (ITTPC) certification or International Peer Educator Training Program Certification (IPTPC) is right choice for your institution.

Supporting Online Community College Students with Trained Tutors in a Post-COVID World
Mark Manasee

COVID-19 created unplanned, fully remote educational spaces. One California community college tutor training program augmented their tutor training practices to pivot to meet the needs of students now confronted with fully online learning. Using a mixed methodology approach (e.g., survey and focus groups, individual interviews) over the course of one year, this program attempted to identify successes and potential gaps in providing equitable online tutoring access and to investigate possible challenges in meeting student affective needs within new, fully online tutoring spaces. Findings indicated clear gaps in student knowledge about online tutoring services, a high level of affective satisfaction with online tutoring, and a demographic mismatch between the proportion of student groups who utilized tutoring services as compared to the proportion who responded to the survey. Ultimately, it was found that tutor training programs need to continue to update training practices to meet the needs of students in a post-COVID world.

Unlock your inner Genius
Brian Madrid

For the last five years, I’ve been obsessed with finding out what millionaires and top performers do day in and day out to have reached their level of success. I’ve spent the last five years of my life researching what the challenges are that business professionals must overcome before being able to consistently reach their goals and successes. It didn’t matter if they were in IT, banking, or Olympic athletes. Their challenges came down to making effective decisions making and how negative beliefs clouded their vision. I’ve reached out to top CEOs, entrepreneurs, and athletes and asked what they attribute to their success. I try and talk with every CEO where I speak to pick their brain. I’m obsessed with finding the key to succeed in any industry. I’ve taken all of my learnings, the hundreds of conversations that I’ve had, and have narrowed it down to three key steps that will allow any business professional to overcome challenges, and reach a high level of success.

Elevate Your Online Tutoring Program with ACTLA Standards Certification
Howard Masuda

Elevate your online tutoring program and build for the future.  Develop an effective, certified online tutoring program using ACTLA’s (Association of Colleges for Tutoring and Learning Assistance) Online Tutoring Standards and ACTLA’S CLADEA (Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations)-endorsed Online Tutoring Program Certification guidelines.

8:00 am
8:00 am

Registration Table Open

8:00 am
8:00 am

Breakfast on Your Own

9:00 am
9:00 am

Session Group XI

Maximize your time and double your revenue
Katy Schmitt

I bootstrapped and build my tutoring business a part-time job in 2018 with my two small children in tow. We’re exceeding $1M in revenue because of three key strategies.

Peer Education Leaders: Doubling Down the Value of Holistic Student Support
Michelle McIllece Miers

Research supports the efficacy of peer education. Peers learn better from peers – at least when it comes to active, interactive, and supplemental learning. Students as peer educators contribute significantly not only to individual student success, but they also have the potential to greatly multiply the efforts of professional academic support staff. And, if a peer education program is done well, the student leaders will sharpen and develop their own skills too, both as learners and as professionals.

“The Art of Tutoring: Engaging with students in-and-out of the classroom and building a collaborative learning environment.
Dale Mommer

The Pandemic has forever changed academia and students have adapted to the new reality as universities transition back to in-person services.  The first part of the presentation will be an introduction of the tutoring space at the University of Idaho and strategies used to engage with students that utilize the services in-person and online over zoom.  As part of the introductory part of the presentation, I will go over communication skills that are critical to adjust and change to engage with students through a collaborative learning environment.  The presentation will also emphasize creating a tutoring atmosphere that is both adaptable and flexible for student’s needs.  The presentation will go over methods of addressing issues such as the benefits of a centralized tutoring space and decentralized tutoring space.  This presentation will go over how to create a centralized location for tutoring support and create a space where students want to be.   The presentation will also address how to change your tutoring model to address the change in student behaviors.  I will share how over the course of three years I have changed the tutoring model to address a wider range of student needs. Lastly, this presentation will address how to focus tutoring on specific skills and subject areas that will not just engage with students but encourage students to come back for tutoring throughout the semester.

How to Communicate in a Way That Opens Doors
Sara Phillips

 The presentation will help the audience to learn highly effective communication skills that will allow them to fully connect with their audience in a way that makes the listener receptive to new information, allows the presenter to land their message, and create desire in the listener to make changes in the form of being enrolled in a new process that establishes significant changes in results.

10:00 am
10:00 am

Session Group XII

Genius Jam Keynote Speaker
Felecia Hatcher

Working in this new normal requires you to step into your Zone of Genius, to be mentally prepared to design the future, and develop new ways that foster collaboration, culture, creativity, and commitment to working on something much bigger than ourselves. In this session, you will learn how to find your north star, step boldly into your personal zone of genius to achieve peak performance, pivot your mindset, become more engaged and impactful within the innovation economy, and recharge with the ability to take on the world.

Professional Development Opportunities with CLADEA member organizations
Jenny Haley

The Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations (CLADEA) is the unifying council for ACTLA, ACTP, CRLA, and NCLCA.  Learn about certifications, publications, grants, scholarships, and events offered by our member organizations, as well as CLADEA’s Fellows Program, conference scholarship for new practitioners, and publications.  Elevate your professional development!

Using the Rowan University Thrive framework to shape the development of Peer Tutors and Student Success Coaches
Laura Repsher and Erica Garcia-Conway

Rowan University is committed to helping each student thrive in their student experience. Through the use of the Rowan Thrive framework, the Student Support Services division has incorporated a trauma-informed approach to train student leaders and help them enhance their own well-being and resiliency. The presenters will discuss the Rowan Thrive framework and the 6 dimensions of well-being that serve as a model for enhancing the student leadership training of Peer Tutors and Student Success Coaches.

Coaching Interventions for Academic Probation Students (Outcomes and Process)
Joseph Sanchez

Students who are placed on academic probation are less likely to persist and graduate. This session will build upon previous research by demonstrating how a college-level student success center at Texas A&M University implemented an academic coaching intervention for students on academic probation that made significant improvements to student grades.  By utilizing data collected from students through a self-assessment survey, assigning interventions, and using academic coaching to monitor ongoing progress, student success practitioners can improve student outcomes.  The session will introduce the Byrne Student Success center, and provide background on the mission, goals, and key areas of development the center focuses on.  In addition participants we walked through the academic probation coaching intervention which includes initial student outreach, a description of the student self-assessment, initial and follow up meeting frameworks, and a brief case study to demonstrate the intervention process.  In addition, the session will provide resources such as the student self-assessment survey template, examples of case-management interventions (time-management, study skills, note taking, stress management, and strategic referrals to university resources), and data on student outcomes for review.  Finally, the presenter will actively engage with participants through a question-and-answer session after the presentation.

11:00 am
11:00 am

Session Group XIII

Tutoring Post-Pandemic: How have student approaches to learning changed?
Cailin Sweeney

Everything changed when the pandemic hit in March of 2020. It impacted many aspects of our lives, but there was an especially large impact on students and the world of education. When it came to tutoring, people had to come up with new and creative solutions to assist students in learning during the pandemic. This included the use of platforms like Zoom and various other asynchronous learning techniques. In our presentation, we will discuss what tutoring now looks like in a post-pandemic world and the changes that have occurred because of it. This has raised various questions, such as: What techniques are students using both in and out of the classroom in order to learn and retain information? What emotional and psychological effects were caused by the pandemic that have impacted student learning? Our presentation will demonstrate how student approaches to learning have changed and explain what we can do as tutors to effectively help our tutees. We will discuss cited research and share personal experiences regarding the topic, and we will offer suggestions for ways to successfully tutor post-pandemic. This presentation will include group discussions and opportunities to interact with the presenters.

Creating a Library of Asynchronous Learning Resources
Heather Slee

Tutors can’t be everywhere and available 24, 7, but our students often need help when away from campus or after hours. In this session, you’ll learn tips on how to create engaging and focused video tutorials using free software and graphics programs. While connecting with a tutor is best, providing a library of tutorials can be a useful resource for students with busy schedules, students who have difficulty accessing the physical building, and students who prefer asynchronous, self-paced learning.

“Caught in a Bad Bromance”: Toxic Masculinity in College Life Coaching
Drew Stapp

Throughout the past few years, many higher education institutions report low retention rates for male students compared to non-male college students across the country (National Clearinghouse, 2022). Such observations have led many to investigate how they navigate college life. Toxic masculinity has framed many of these conversations. One significant consequence of toxic masculinity is that it inhibits help-seeking behaviors and academic support services, which resists our jobs as College Life Coaches. Our role is to support students’ individual needs and help them achieve their personal, academic, and professional goals. Thus, how can we, as coaches and other academic support professionals, help male students when the tight grip of toxic masculinity prevents a positive relationship? The presentation will evaluate several critical factors through the lens of hegemonic masculinity (Connell, 1987 & 2005) and student engagement theories (Tinto, 1987; Astin, 1984; Sanford, 1966). Further, the presentation will include discourse to explore the critical relationship between higher education, retention rates, and toxic masculinity culture. It also hopes to address how coaching can empower male students to understand themselves better, promoting healthier environments and behaviors.

Refund / Cancellation Policy:

Requests for refunds of conference registration must be made in email on or before January 15 to be considered, less a $50 processing fee. Payments for Pre-Conference, campus visits, or functions with a meal cannot be refunded because ACTP commits to pay for these activities in advance based on the number of attendees registered.

Requests for refunds of the Conference emailed after January 15, will not be honored unless they are requested as a result of serious illness or death in the family.  After January 15, there will be no cash refund but a seat for next years Conference will be reserved.  Requests made 5 days prior to the Institute date will not be considered.

Payments by institutions will be refunded to the institutions and payments made by individuals will be returned to the individual.

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